Pokemon GO-bal Positioning System

Earlier this July, my childhood dream finally came true.  Over the series’ 20 year history, I’ve played more than 30 Pokemon video games, and with each new release I’ve wanted to become a gym leader and to catch ‘em all – a feat I accomplished, once, back in the first game.   Now, as a 28-year old working on a Ph.D., I can finally achieve my dream with the help of Niantic’s latest augmented reality game, Pokemon GO.

 IMG_2016-07-10-13445138 I can find a Pidgey (the Pigeon Pokemon) on a city sidewalk thanks to GPS telling Pokemon GO where I am.  Finding a Goldeen (the Goldfish Pokemon) on the same city street would not make sense.

In Pokemon GO, as I wander around my city, my phone periodically vibrates indicating that I’ve found a Pokemon.  I quickly look at my phone and tap on the Pokemon to enter a battle with it.  The game knows where I am thanks to GPS, the Global Positioning System, and uses that information to show me location-appropriate Pokemon, such as Water-type Pokemon close to rivers and Fire-type Pokemon in deserts.

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The Cosmos’ Attack on Computers

In 1984, IBM encountered a mystery: computers in Denver were making ten times more mistakes than the national average. The operators of the computers kept reporting memory errors, but whenever they sent a memory unit back to IBM, the company could find nothing physically wrong. Why wouldn’t computers work properly in Denver?

For several years, the operators had to work around the fact that their computers would occasionally just forget things. It was almost like the computers were high – which, it turned out, was precisely the problem. At 5,280 feet, computers in Denver are much more susceptible to an unlikely culprit: cosmic rays. Continue reading